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E-Cigarettes Will they help me quit?

Q&A



Are E-Cigarettes Safer than Smoking?

Quitting cigarettes is the best thing you can do to improve your health, but e-cigarettes are not FDA-approved for quitting smoking. There are seven FDA-approved medications to help you quit.

Talk with your healthcare provider about which medications are right for you before seeking alternative methods.
What is an e-cigarette?
E-cigarettes (also known as Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems, or ENDS) are battery-powered devices that deliver nicotine through a flavored vapor. They are made so users can feel like they are inhaling tobacco smoke, without the burning that occurs when lighting a tobacco-based cigarette.

E-cigarettes are not approved by the FDA as an effective method to help smokers quit. There is no regulation or quality control for e-cigarettes. At this time, the evidence is mixed on using e-cigarettes for quitting.
What do we know about the e-cigarette?
The amount of nicotine in an e-cigarette varies. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) testing has shown that nicotine amounts do not always match the labeling.

It is still unknown if e-cigarettes are safe. Levels of carcinogens and toxicants are lower in e-cigarettes than in traditional cigarettes. Further research is needed to determine health-related effects.

What do we know about e-cigarettes?

E-cigarettes are not regulated – the amount of nicotine in each product varies. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) testing has shown that nicotine amounts do not always match the labeling.

It is still unknown if e-cigarettes are safe. Levels of carcinogens and toxicants are lower in e-cigarettes than in traditional cigarettes. Further research is needed to determine health-related effects.
Okay, what does this all mean?
Current evidence is insufficient to recommend the use of electronic nicotine delivery systems (e-cigarettes) for tobacco cessation. Medications approved by the FDA for nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) include patches, gum, lozenges, sprays, and inhalers, or medications like varenicline (Chantix®) or Bupropion (Zyban). These medications, combined with individual or group counseling, have been shown to be the most successful ways to quit.

If you’re looking to quit smoking, we suggest U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved medications. There are not enough study results or industry regulations for safe e-cigarette use. So hang in there, and if you truly want to quit, consider the proven methods first.

It’s important that you talk with a healthcare provider when considering alternatives to smoking.
Last updated 8/20/2018 6:08 PM
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